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Vietnam’s Communist Revolution: Professor Tuong Vu Publishes His New Book!

The Department of Political Science is excited to announce the publication of Professor Tuong Vu’s new book  Congratulations Professor Vu – follow the link below to learn more!


Vietnam’s Communist Revolution: The Power and Limits of Ideology”9781316607909

OverviewBy tracing the evolving worldview of Vietnamese communists over 80 years as they led Vietnam through wars, social revolution, and peaceful development, Professor Vu’s book shows the depth and resilience of their commitment to the communist utopia in their foreign policy. Unearthing new material from Vietnamese archives and publications, this book challenges the conventional scholarship and the popular image of the Vietnamese revolution and the Vietnam War as being driven solely by patriotic inspirations. The revolution not only saw successes in defeating foreign intervention, but also failures in bringing peace and development to Vietnam. This was, and is, the real tragedy of Vietnam. Spanning the entire history of the Vietnamese revolution and its aftermath, this book examines its leaders’ early rise to power, the tumult of three decades of war with France, the US, and China, and the stubborn legacies left behind which remain in Vietnam today.

Vu

About the Author: Tuong Vu has been on the faculty of the Department of Political Science since 2008. He has held visiting appointments at Princeton University and the National University of Singapore, and has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. Vu’s research concerns the comparative politics of state formation, development, nationalism, and revolutions, with a particular focus on East Asia. His earlier book, ‘Paths to Development in Asia: South Korea, Vietnam, China, and Indonesia’ (Cambridge University Press, 2010), presents a systematic comparison of six Asian cases combined with an in-depth analysis of Vietnam and Indonesia based on primary sources. The case studies demonstrate that patterns of state formation had decisive impacts on subsequent developmental performance.



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